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Yin and Yang of the intro theme of Eastenders

The more I look at the intro theme of BBC soap Eastenders, the more perfect it seems that the shape and curve of the River Thames has been chosen and shot, and the millennium dome is just on the right place!
I don't know if anybody have been ever aware that the shape of two side of riverbank implies intercourse of Yin and Yang? A male and a female or two males holding together?
The first shot in 1985 used a miniature model of London and the River Thames, then we got a true to life birds'eye camera shot of the same sequence in 1993. With the flowing of music, the picture moves and turns, on one head the millennium dome, and on the other head are two adjacent parks, one big and the other small, or you may focus on just one side of the river, then you make out that one recess, and the other protrude.
With the developing of the fighting for love plot between Syed and Christian, you may now confidently apply this intro scene to two man. I have never feel comfortable about the bed scene of gay love on TV, but it seems a fashion to pepper up all soap operas with a gay couple. 

To accept the reality of gay love is a slow and difficult process to me, and until tonight I have been kept in my mind the question that if Marc Elliott and John Partridge are gay in real life. I solved this question when I was trying to find out why there are so many gay bed scene in the new Torchwood series, the supernatural twists and turns of the love drama between Jack and Angelo. In one BBC special program, John Barrowman tried to find out if he is born gay or not, nature or nurture, and at some extent he seems to blame his father dressed him up in bikini when he was a young boy.

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