Skip to main content

Poisonous British Plants

Many British plants are poisonous to a greater of less extent. The leaves, fruits and roots of many plants act as irritants when they are eaten, but in others the effect is much more than merely irritating and is definitely poisonous, especially monkshood, deadly nightshade, and foxglove.

The root of monkshood is dark brown outside and white inside, and from it is obtained aconite and preparations made from it. In appearance the root is very like horseradish and has often been mistaken for it. When it is taken by mistake there is a severe tingling sensation and burning in the mouth, followed by numbness. In an hour or two vomiting usually takes place, and is severe in character. The burning sensation begins to be felt in the stomach, and the skin is cold and clammy. The pupils of the eyes become enlarged, and the eyes are staring. The pulse becomes irregular and there is a feeling of suffocation.

Deadly nightshade is well known in English hedges and woods, and is recognized by its clusters of small purple flowers with orange contres, usually found climbing among a tangle of other plants in the hedges. Later on the flowers turn into bunches of bright scarlet berries, and as they ripen about the same time as the blackberries and often grow among them they are easily eaten in mistake by children. The symptoms of poisoning are great dryness of mouth and throat, enlarged pupils of the eyes, vomiting, palpitation, and in advanced stage, delirium.

The purple foxglove is well known in the English countryside, but it is also specially cultivated, for its leaves is obtained the important heart stimulant, digitalis. This is a poison in any but small doses. The symptoms of digitalis poisoning include vomiting and slowing of pulse beat.

Other common English plants that cause poisoning are laburnum, cuckoo-pint, black and white bryonies, common hemlock, including cowbane, fool's parsley and water-dropwort, privet and holly, and yellow vetchling. Toadstools and other fungi may be poisonous. They can be distinguished from the harmless edible ones by their bright colour, a bitter taste and an unpleasant smell. All of these poisonous plants cause vomiting and diarrhoea, cramps, and sometimes drowsiness and convulsions.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Fw: Story -- A Lazy Fat King

Sent from my BlackBerry® wireless device From: brenda sheng <brenda.rili.sheng@gmail.com> Date: Sat, 22 Feb 2014 19:26:52 +0000 To: Jim Sheng<jim.sheng@gmail.com> Subject: Story
The Fat King

Once upon a time there was a kingdom with... a fat king! He was very fat and lazy, he had 10 servants to help him to eat, and helped him to go to bed, and lots of other things. His first servant served the food on the table, the second servant put food on the spoon, the third servant opened his mouth, the fourth servant put the food in his mouth, the fifth servant had to help him chew! The sixth one fed him soup, the seventh one blew the soup if it was too hot, the eighth one wiped his mouth with a wet towel, the ninth one fed him desserts, and the tenth one put drinks in his mouth. The king was ''so'' lazy that he didn't even walk! He was carried around by some servants.

One day the chairs for the king were braking so the servants had to make special beds, then the…

You can find your Wireless Network Key on Virgin Media Wireless Router

We have a new netbook computer, and don't know where to find network key, which is needed to setup wireless connection.

A network key may also be called WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy) key or WPA (Wi-Fi Protected Access) key.

A wireless network key is a security feature that prevents unauthorized users from accessing a wireless network. An unprotected network is an unlocked virtual door, anybody within range can piggyback on the network undetected.

I use Virgin media broadband with a Virgin media wireless router, this router has a WPA key taped on the router, that WPA key is an English word consisting of 10 letters.

To tape network key on the router is a good idea, because we may never lose or forget a wireless network key as long as we possess the router.

The Meaning of Derby City Council Logo

The logo of Derby City Council looks quite abstract and modern. I wonder what's the meaning of it? The lower-left part of the logo looks like a snail (or the initial letter D in Derby?), the upper-right part seems a river, (Derwent river?) these two parts are connected by a straight line at the bottom.

I did some searches on the web trying to find out the true meaning of Derby City Council logo, but without success. So, I wrote to tourist information, and got the answer from Michael:
The Logo is a representation of two of Derby's oldest emblems, one being a ram the other a buck (deer). Obviously the logo is a modern interpretation of these two figures so it is not obvious unless you know what to look for. Most people do seem to agree with you that it looks like a snail however.
Ram! the curly horn of ram looks like a snail indeed. The ram and the deer are from coat of arms of City of Derby,
In this coats of arms, we can see the deers both in shield (arms) and supporter, but the…