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Constituencies, wards and local councils

Constituencies (a.k.a. parliamentary constituencies): each electing one Member of Parliament (MP) every 5 years to the House of Commons (Parliament). There are 650 constituencies in the UK.Wards (a.k.a. electoral divisions or electoral wards) is the primary unit of English electoral geography for borough and district councils, county councils or city councils. Each ward elects either one or two councillors to be members of the local council. There were 9,456 electoral wards/divisions in the UK and each ward has an average electorate of about 5,500 people, but ward population can vary substantially.Local council is made up of a number of Councillors (Cllr) who meet regularly to make decisions about the direction of the council and the work it does for the community. As elected bodies local councils are responsible to their local community. Attending a council meeting is the best way to find out what they do and how they make decisions. Members of public can attend public council meetin…

The legend of St. George and the Union Jack Flag

In the ancient city of Lydda, in Palestine, by the Mediterranean Sea, the king of Lydda a beautiful daughter, and the people of the city were happy and prosperous.

But one day a dragon came out of the sea devouring animals and people. The wise men of the city held consultation with the King, and it was agreed that the dragon might be kept at bay if food were provided for it. So each morning an animal was killed and left for the dragon. But as months passed the supply of cattle grew less, until no sheep or other beast remained.

Again, the wise men held consultation with the king, and they decided that each day one of the citizens must chosen by lot and offered to the monster, and unfortunately the first lot fell to the King's only daughter. Though the people of Lydda begged the king to relent, and a hundred men offered to take her place, the King declared that the princess must pay the price that chance had laid upon her.

It so happened that the young knight George rode that day towards Lydda, and saw the princess in her white dress bound to the stake. He heard the story of the dragon from the Princess. He fought with the dragon and killed it, and rescued the Princess.

This is only a legend of St. George, but St. george was a real person. He was a soldier in the Roman army in the fourth century. When serving in Syria he was put to death for being a Christian.

There already existed the legend of the sea monster at Lydda. Before Christian times the people of Lydda worshiped the sun. The dragon represented the Lord of Darkness and Evil, who rose from the sea when the sun died each night beyond the western hills, to be conquered by the Lord of Light and Goodness when the sun returned at dawn.

The legend became to attached to St. George's name because of the Crusade of the Christian knights of England night hundred years ago. Fighting against the town of Acre, the Crusaders were supposedly led to victory by a ghostly knight riding a great white horse, whom they afterwards learned to be St. George. In tribute to this, the King made him patron saint of England, and the Knights of Garter were founded at Windsor in his honour.

His emblem, a red cross on a white field, was warn over their armour as a jacket by the soldiers. From this comes the name jack, and when the flag was united with the blue-and-white flag of Scotland it became as the Union Jack.

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