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Constituencies, wards and local councils

Constituencies (a.k.a. parliamentary constituencies): each electing one Member of Parliament (MP) every 5 years to the House of Commons (Parliament). There are 650 constituencies in the UK.Wards (a.k.a. electoral divisions or electoral wards) is the primary unit of English electoral geography for borough and district councils, county councils or city councils. Each ward elects either one or two councillors to be members of the local council. There were 9,456 electoral wards/divisions in the UK and each ward has an average electorate of about 5,500 people, but ward population can vary substantially.Local council is made up of a number of Councillors (Cllr) who meet regularly to make decisions about the direction of the council and the work it does for the community. As elected bodies local councils are responsible to their local community. Attending a council meeting is the best way to find out what they do and how they make decisions. Members of public can attend public council meetin…

Bowel Cancer Screening Letter Sent to Wrong Address

An invitation letter for Mr D Miller to take part in Cancer Screening, from the leaflet, I know that GP provides these contact details, this Mr Miller's name still in GP's registration.

I received many letters for Mrs Thompson, one day the postman noticed the ridiculousness of delivering these letter to me, then I receive these letters for Thompson any more.

Dear Mr Miller

This is an invitation to take part in the NHS Bowel Cancer Screening Programme. This opportunity is available every 2 years to all men and women aged 60-69 who are registered with a GP in England. If you have received this invitation and are aged 70 or over, this is because the screening age range is being extended to 60-74 in your area. If you have taken part in the programme before, it is now two years since your last test. Your GP knows that the NHS Bowel Cancer Screening Programme is being offered in his or her area. The aim of the screening programme is to detect bowel cancers at an early stage, when there are better chances of successful treatment and cure.

You will automatically be sent a test kit, including full instructions, in about a week's time. The kit is simple to use in the privacy of your own home. If you wish to take advantage of the screening programme, all you have to do is complete the kit and return it to us in the Freepost envelope that will be provided. You will receive a result letter within two weeks. We do not have knowledge of your medical history, and screening may not be appropriate for everybody. For example if you:

- have had a colonoscopy or a barium enema plus a sigmoidoscopy within the last 2 years;
- are on a bowel polyp surveillance programme;
- are currently being treated for bowel cancer;
- have had your large bowel removed;
- are currently being treated for ulcerative colitis or Crohn's Disease;
- are currently awaiting bowel investigations arranged by your GP.

If you fall into any of the above categories, or you do not wish to participate in the screening programme, please contact us to let us know. The Freephone number is at the top of this letter. If you need help from family or a carer to use the kit, please call (or ask them to call) the Freephone number for further important information. Please take the time to read the enclosed leaflet 'Bowel Cancer Screening - The Facts', which may help to answer any questions you have. You can also call the Freephone number if you have any queries about whether to take part.

Yours sincerely

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