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The Church of England: What does these tongue-twistering words mean?

The Church of England is called the Anglican Church in other countries and Episcopal Church in Scotland and in USA.

The word Anglican originates in ecclesia anglicana, a medieval Latin phrase dating to at least 1246 meaning the English Church. Adherents of Anglicanism are called Anglicans.

The word "Episcopal" is Middle English, from Late Latin episcoplis, from episcopus, meaning bishop; Episcopal Church is a church governed by a bishop.

The king or queen (monarch) is the head, or Supreme Governor, of the Church of England. The Monarch is not allowed to marry anyone who is not Protestant. The spiritual leader of the Church of England is the Archbishop of Canterbury.

The Church of Scotland is Presbyterian, national and free from state control. Presbyter means "an elder in a church", the adjective form of this word in Greeks also means "older", and the root of it possibly originally "one who leads the cattle." Scottish church are governed by elders, instead of bishops.

England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland each have a national saint called a patron Saint, each saint has a feast day:

St. David, Wales, 1 March
St. Patrick's day, Northern Ireland, 17 March
St. George's day, England, 23 April
St. Andrew's day, Scotland, 30 November

When I was in Northern Ireland, I heard local people saying Protestant as "protison", they can't understand me when I say "protes-tant", with clearly pronounced aspirated 't' after 's' and at the end. I seem never have chance of listening people say "Presbyterian", although I often pass by a church with a sign of "Presbyterian Church", and feel very puzzled by this big tongue twistering word.

Near our house, in the Prince Charles Avenue, a church building called "Diocesan Centre", as with the big words, "Anglican, Presbyterian, Episcopal", mentioned above, this "Diocesan" to me is another big puzzle. This "Diocesan" is also a bishop who have jurisdiction over a diocese, while a diocese is "a governor's jurisdiction", originally from Greek, meaning "province".

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