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From Sink to Sewer: Order a free Fat Trap

Being responsible about waste disposal in the home is very important, particularly when it comes to getting rid of fats, oils and greases (FOG).

Many people don't realise the harmful effects of pouring these down the drain, but FOG quickly solidifies when it hit the cool walls of the sewer and sticks to the side. Over time this builds up - preventing the normal flow of waste water and debris from passing through. With no way through, the waste water backs up in the system coming out of drains, sewers and potentially into your home.

You can help to do your bit to collect fats oils and greases in a container and dispose of them in the bin, not down the sink.

Fat Traps are suitable to collect any cooled kitchen fat you produce in the home. Your water supplier may have a free Fat Trap for you. If you are a Severn Trent Water customer, you can order a Fat Trap for your home by completing the form.

Top ten tasting tap waters

1. Severn Trent Water
2. Anglian Water
3. Thames Water
4. Dwr Cymru Welsh Water
5. Southern Water
6. Scottish Water
7. South West Water
8. Yorkshire Water
9. United Utilities
10. Wessex Water

In a blind tasting, organised by the charity The Green Thing, the panel, including Michelin-starred chef Tom Aikens, gave 10 firms' samples a mark out of five for clarity, smell and most importantly taste.

One panellist described water from Severn Trent, which covers large parts of the Midlands and mid-Wales, as like "a mountain stream of freshness"(BBC).

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