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Charitable Landscape gardening


Three gardeners came to work on my neighbour's garden. They cut grasses, clear out dead leaves and wild flowers, and dig up the edges around back and front gardens.

When I picked up my daughter from school, my daughter greeted them when she passed by, she always feel very proud when she say hello to strangers, and disappointed when not be answered. So greeted them and had a chat.

The man told me that they were working for Betel of Britain Charity, a free Christian residence.

I was bit surprised, and asked: "Do you work for free"? Because my neighbour is an Indian, from Tamil, the family definitely is not Christian.

The man answered:"Not for free, all income goes to the charity."

"Right," I said, "So, you are volunteer for Betel?"

He said there are many residence sites has been opened, even one opened recently in Mongolia. I asked if there was any in China. He said, I don't know but I hope so.

He give me a leaflet, the slogan on the leaflet says, their landscape gardening is "the charitable thing to do this season". and "Leave your landscape gardening to us... and help us to heal the hurting."

I didn't ask if Betel's gardeners are their former "homeless and substance-dependent people", although I thought so and quite curious to know. Because from their behaviour and appearance, I could still feel the deep wound still there. They must be, because from their website, I can found those information:

"Betel of Britain is a caring, not-for-profit Christian community in the heart of the UK dedicated to restoring homeless and substance-dependent people to productive, independent lifestyles. Our residences are drug- and alcohol-free, and all our support services are free of charge."

They do all kind of gardening jobs, such as slabbing, block paving, trees, turfing, fencing, patios, hedges, clearing and many more. And their charge is quite reasonable, I asked the man how much did my neighbour paid for the work, he said, very little, reluctant to give the real number. But I found it out from my neighbour.

They offer free estimates.

Their website:
http://www.betel.co.uk/

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