The unbelievable low house price during 1920s and 1930s

Derby, Our Century, published as part of the Derby Evening Telegraph's Millennium celebrations, it looks back at Derby and Derbyshire over the greater part of the last hundred years, telling the story of places and personalities that made Derby the city that it is today.

Unlike traditional local heritage books, Our Century -By The People Who Lived It does not carry detailed historical records which have been researched from the archives. Instead, it is packed with evocative eye-witness accounts by the people who were there.

One article written by Peter Saunders (Manor Road Hoylake Wirral), titled Pre-war boom in affordable housing hits Colwyn Avenue. This article tells us the unbelievable low house price during 1920s and 1930s, compared to the current house price, despite that it has dropped remarkably from the highest point because of the credit crisis.

Thanks to a boom in affrodable housing plan during pre-war era, people in Derby moved from congested streets to the new private housing developments on the leafier outskirts of the town. At that time, more than 2,500,000 houses were built for private sale in Britain during the years between the two world wars, and many of them were modestly priced, with mortgages available on fairly easy terms. Deposits on new houses could be as low as £25, particularly towards the end of the 1930s when competition was keen in the building industry.

The author's parents were among the first who moved in a neat semi-detached house with generous gardens which formed the new outer suburbs of Derby. The house cost around £600 and gained the builder an encouraging subsidy from the government.

£600 for a semi-detached house with a generous gardens! Look at that, could you believe it?!

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