Posts

Showing posts from May, 2013

It's cheaper for online banking

Last time I went to my bank to transfer money overseas, my bank charged me 25 pounds.

Then I did it online for same amounts of money, I only need to pay £17.

I wonder why it's price is different. I called the bank to ask if the price has changed, the agent told me the price for sending money overseas is always £17 online, and £30 by telephone banking, but he doesn't know how much by doing it in one of the branch offices, it depends on different location.

Obviously, it's much more cheaper do it online, the reason, I think, is that the bank doesn't need to pay its employee in the call centre for the transaction, it takes time and prone to mistake. You fill the form by yourself, DIY, and funds will be transferred overseas electronically, probably without even reviewed by the bank if every details are correct, and the money goes to the right beneficiary.
Sent from my BlackBerry® wireless device

The Red Hand of Ulster

Ulster is another and older name for Northern Ireland, and its badge is a red hand.

Long years ago, so legend tells, a party of bold adventurers was approaching the coast of Ireland when the leader announced that whoever of his party first touched the shore should possess the territory he reached. Thereupon an ancestor of the O'Neills from whom descended the Kings of Ulster, finding another boat forging slowly ahead of his, struck off his left hand and flung it on to the land. Thus the hand of Ulster, red with O'Neill blood, still remains an emblem.
Sent from my BlackBerry® wireless device

John O' Groats' Octagonal House

On the edge of northeast Scotland there once stood John 'O Ggroat's House.

According to some legends, John de Groot was a Dutchman. His family grew and grew since settled there until eventually there were eight brothers, and a dispute then arose as to which of them should sit at the head of the table, near the door.

To settle the quarrel once and for all John built a house that was octagonal, or eight-sided. It had eight doors and eight windows on the ground floor and the dinning table had eight sides to match. Thus each brother came into the main living-room by his own door, went straight to his place at the festive board, and so there was no excuse whatever for any arguments.
Sent from my BlackBerry® wireless device