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Showing posts from May, 2011

Earliest Children’s books in England

Children’s books existed even before the printing press had been invented, they are “the Golden Key that opens the Enchanted Door.”

There were many books written for children well before Caxton set up his first printing-press. Generally they were written and copied by the monks in their monastery cells and they combined the teaching of reading with religious instruction. The first children’s book ever printed in UK was probably “The Primer in English Most Necessary for the Education of Children,” published about 1537. After reading came writing, and the first copy-book in England was printed about the year 1571. Later there were “Writing Sheets” or “School Pieces” and it is really from these School pieces of the late eighteenth century that our modern Christmas cards developed.

Story books and nursery rhymes appeared later. Probably “Old Mother Hubbard” was the first of the nursery rhymes, though the earliest printed edition still in existence was only published about the same time. …

The legend of St. George and the Union Jack Flag

In the ancient city of Lydda, in Palestine, by the Mediterranean Sea, the king of Lydda a beautiful daughter, and the people of the city were happy and prosperous.

But one day a dragon came out of the sea devouring animals and people. The wise men of the city held consultation with the King, and it was agreed that the dragon might be kept at bay if food were provided for it. So each morning an animal was killed and left for the dragon. But as months passed the supply of cattle grew less, until no sheep or other beast remained.

Again, the wise men held consultation with the king, and they decided that each day one of the citizens must chosen by lot and offered to the monster, and unfortunately the first lot fell to the King's only daughter. Though the people of Lydda begged the king to relent, and a hundred men offered to take her place, the King declared that the princess must pay the price that chance had laid upon her.

It so happened that the young knight George rode that day …

Fairies in United Kingdom

In the book Phantasmagoria (Ryhme? and Reason) by Lewis Carroll, the Phantom ghost told the man named Tibbets, he has a very big and variety family. His father was a Brownie, and mother was a fairy. His mother seemed very productive and she brought her children in different ways: one was a Pixy, two were Fays (fairy), another was a Banshee. The Fetch and kepie went to school, and gave a lot of trouble; Next came a poltergeist and Ghoul, and then two Trolls, a Gobline, and a Double. Next came an Elf, and then a Phantom that's himself. And last, a Leprechaun.


During the disscussion, the Phantom ghost told the man, just as in human society, in ghost society there is a hierachy, and ghost are answerable to the King who must be addressed as "Your Royal Whiteness". There is even a Knight Mayor, whose job it is to give you "nightmares". There is also Inspectre who caught a "sort of chill", and he can only quench his thirsty and rid himself his chill by visit…

Poisonous British Plants

Many British plants are poisonous to a greater of less extent. The leaves, fruits and roots of many plants act as irritants when they are eaten, but in others the effect is much more than merely irritating and is definitely poisonous, especially monkshood, deadly nightshade, and foxglove.

The root of monkshood is dark brown outside and white inside, and from it is obtained aconite and preparations made from it. In appearance the root is very like horseradish and has often been mistaken for it. When it is taken by mistake there is a severe tingling sensation and burning in the mouth, followed by numbness. In an hour or two vomiting usually takes place, and is severe in character. The burning sensation begins to be felt in the stomach, and the skin is cold and clammy. The pupils of the eyes become enlarged, and the eyes are staring. The pulse becomes irregular and there is a feeling of suffocation.

Deadly nightshade is well known in English hedges and woods, and is recognized by its clu…